Names on the War Memorial

 

NEW LUCE PARISH WAR MEMORIAL

The Names, Service and dates of death on the first line of each entry are as they appear on the memorial.  1914 – 1918

JAMES HEWITSON, 1/8th A. & S. HIGHS. KILLED 17th MARCH 1917.

James Hewitson – age 22 – Private (3708 & 301456) 1/8th (Argyllshire) Battalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

James was a shepherd for the Duke of Argyll at Campbelltown when he enlisted in March 1916. He had previously been employed at Balker, Inch, Wigtownshire. His father was also a shepherd who had worked at Dirniemow, New Luce for about 20 years before moving to Ballantrae, Ayrshire.

Born 1894 in Dalmellington, Ayrshire. (Source:GRoS – Birth Register and 1901 census)
Son of Robert and Grace (Douglas) Hewitson, of Dirniemow Farm, Glenwhilly, New Luce, of
Awies, New Luce and of Little Tongue, Inch, Wigtownshire. (Source:CWGC and family grave in Inch Parish Churchyard, Wigtownshire)
Killed in Action – 17 March 1917.
Commonwealth War Grave – Roclincourt Valley Cemetery, Arras, France.
Also listed on the Ballantrae War Memorial.
Roclincourt was just within the Allied lines before the Battle of Arras in 1917 and it was from here that the 51st (Highland) and 34th Divisions advanced on 9 April 1917. The cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when graves, mostly from the 34th and 51st Divisions, were brought in from the surrounding battlefields. (Source:CWGC)

JAMES KEATINGS, 15th H.L.I. KILLED 7th MAY 1916.

James Keatings – age 35 – Private (13837) 15th Battalion (1st Glasgow) Highland Light Infantry.  Known as the Glasgow Tramways Battalion.

James was a motorman (tram driver) with the Glasgow Corporation Tramways and was living at 29 Winston Street, Parkhead, Glasgow when he enlisted. (Source:SDGW and Glasgow Roll of Honour)

Born 1881 in New Luce. (Source:SNWM and GRoS – Birth Register)
Son of Michael and Elizabeth (Wright) Keatings of Main Street, New Luce.
Husband of Daisy (Whyatt) Keatings who he married in 1907 in St. Rollox, Glasgow.
(Source:GRoS – Marriage Register)

Killed in Action – 8 May 1916.
Commonwealth War Grave – Authuile Military Cemetery, Albert, France.
Also listed on the 15th HLI memorial in the Glasgow Museum of Transport and on the GCT Dennistoun Depot Memorial, now at the Parkhead Depot.
The 32nd Division was largely comprised of locally raised units often known as “Pals”. It was a predominantly a Northern Division, although locally raised units from Glasgow were also in the structure. In November 1915 the Division received a warning order to prepare to sail for France and took part in it’s first major battle at Albert on 1 July 1916.

W J McLEAN, ROYAL ENGINEERS. KILLED 19th NOVEMBER 1917.

William Jackson McLean – age 30 – Pioneer (418464) 14th Division Signal Company, Royal Engineers.

William had been a policeman in Glasgow’s Eastern Division for 4 years when he enlisted in
November 1915. He and his family were living at 2 Yates Street, Camlachie, Glasgow.
(Source:WFP 10/1/1918 p.3e, Police Records and Glasgow Roll of Honour)
Born 1887 in New Luce. (Source:SNWM and GRoS – Birth Register)
Son of David Baird McLean and of Janet (Jackson) McLean of Main Street, New Luce.
Husband of Maggie Girvan (Boyle) McLean who he married in 1910 in Dundonald, Ayrshire.
(Source: GRoS – Marriage Register)
Died of Wounds – 19 November 1917.
Commonwealth War Grave – Duhallow A.D.S. Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium.
Also listed on the City of Glasgow Police Memorial.
Duhallow Advanced Dressing Station was a medical post just north of Ypres. The cemetery contains many graves of the Royal Artillery and of the Royal Engineers. (Source:CWGC)

 

ROBERT McMEEKING, R.F.A. KILLED 12th JUNE 1917.

Robert McMeeking – age 29 – Gunner (951578) 256th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.

Robert was employed on the Glasgow Corporation Tramways and was living at 145 Holmlea Road, Cathcart, Glasgow when he enlisted. (Source:WFP 12/7/1917 p.3d, SDGW and Glasgow Roll of Honour)

Born 1888 in New Luce – as McMecking. (Source:GRoS – Birth Register)
Son of William and Agnes (Hannay) McMecking, of Waterfoot, New Luce.
(Source:CWGC and family grave in New Luce Parish Churchyard)
Killed in Action – 12 June 1917.
Commonwealth War Grave – Anzin-St.Aubin British Cemetery, Arras, France.
Listed on the GCT Langside Depot Memorial, now at the Parkhead Depot.
The village of Anzin-St. Aubin is on the north-western outskirts of Arras. The cemetery was begun by the 51st (Highland) Division (which included the 256th RFA) early in April 1917, and carried on by artillery units and field ambulances until October 1917. (Source:CWGC)

And his brother

WILLIAM McMEEKING, 2nd H.L.I. KILLED 28th APRIL 1917.

William McMeeking – age 31 – Lance Corporal (35161) 2nd Battalion, Highland Light Infantry.

William had served his apprenticeship as a gardener at Lochinch Castle, Castle Kennedy,
Wigtownshire. When he enlisted he was Head Gardener at Craigie House, Ayrshire.
(Source:WFP 25/4/1918 p.3c)

Born 1885 in New Luce – as McMecking. (Source:GRoS – Birth Register)
Son of William and Agnes (Hannay) McMecking, of Waterfoot, New Luce.
(Source:CWGC and family grave in New Luce Parish Churchyard)
Husband of Mary Ann (Matthews) McMeeking, of Stairdam, Murthly, Perthshire who he married in 1914 in Auchtergaven, Perthshire – as McMeeking. (Source:CWGC and GRoS – Marriage Register)
Killed in Action – 28 April 1917.
Commonwealth War Grave – Arras Memorial, France.
On 28 April, British and Canadian forces fought a bitter battle at Arleux-en-Gohelle in an attempt to secure the southeast flank of Vimy Ridge. While this objective was attained, casualties were high.
(Source:Wikipedia)

 

ROBERT McWHIRTER, 7th CAMERON HIGHS. KILLED 25th SEPTEMBER 1915.

Robert McWhirter – age 32 – Private (S/13661) 7th Battalion, Cameron Highlanders.
Robert was an ironmonger when he enlisted in September 1914 in Glasgow. He had served his apprenticeship with J.L. Davidson in Newton Stewart before working with T. Duff in Annan, Dumfriesshire. (Source:Service Record at the National Archives and D&G Standard 9/10/1915 p.3b)

Born 1883 in Bargrennan, Kirkcudbrightshire. (Source:SNWM and GRoS – Birth Register)
Son of the late Helen (McTier) McWhirter. Son of John McWhirter and step-son of Janet
McWhirter of Barlure, New Luce. (Source:CWGC)
Missing in Action – 25 September 1915.
Commonwealth War Grave – Loos Memorial, France.
Also listed on the Bargrennan War Memorial and on the Burgh and Parish of Annan War Memorial.
The 15th (Scottish) Division attacked the village Loos and Hill 70. In a little more than an hour parts of the division occupied Loos and its northern outskirts and Hill 70, whilst some units had pushed on as far as Cite St. Auguste, a mile east of Hill 70. (Source:Battalion War Diary)

THOMAS MILROY, 49th CANADIANS. KILLED 30th OCTOBER 1917.

Thomas Milroy – age 31 – Private (252132) 49th Battalion, Canadian Infantry.
Thomas was farming at Cantuar near Swift Current, Saskatchewan when he enlisted in January 1916.
(Source:Service record at the Library and Archives of Canada and the Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial)

Born 1886 in Inch, Wigtownshire. (Source:GRoS – Birth Register)
Son of Thomas and Mary (Murray) of High Mark, New Luce.
(Source:Family grave in New Luce Parish Churchyard)
Killed in Action – 30 October 1917.
Commonwealth War Grave – Poelcapelle British Cemetery, Ypres, Belgium.
Also listed on the Inch Parish War Memorial and on the Lochryan Parish War Memorial in
Cairnryan.
The Second Battle of Passchendaele – The first assault on 26 October, in pouring rain, saw the Canadians push beyond the wire entanglements on either side the flooded Ravebeek and advance 500 yards. The Canadians were ready to renew their attack on 30 October, when, following a devastating barrage, they reached the outskirts of Passchendaele and were poised to seize the village.
(Source:CWGC and Battalion War Diary)

JOHN MURRAY, 1st BLACK WATCH. KILLED 25th SEPTEMBER 1916.

John Murray – age 29 – Private (S/40297) 1st Battalion, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
Formerly Private (6312) Scottish Horse Yeomanry. (Source:SNWM)
John joined the City of Glasgow Police Force in 1907 and by 1913 had been promoted as a plain clothes constable in the Detective Department. He was living at 178 Slatefield Street, Dennistoun when, in November 1915, he enlisted in the Scottish Horse. He was transferred to the Black Watch before going to France in August 1916.
(Source: WFP 19/11/1916 p.5a, SDGW, Police Records and Glasgow Roll of Honour)
Born 1887 in New Luce. (Source:GRoS – Birth Register)
Son of the late John and Ellen (McDowall) Murray, of The Smithy, New Luce. (Source:CWGC)
Missing in Action – 25 September 1916.
Commonwealth War Grave – Thiepval Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, France.
Also listed on the City of Glasgow Police Memorial.
Battle of the Somme, Day 87 – The Battle of Morval began on 25 September.
The 1st. Battalion, Black Watch bombed up Flers Trench, capturing 300 yards of it. Later in the day the New Zealand Division took over the section. (Source:Somme day by day)

THOMAS NISH, ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS. DIED 26th JANUARY 1917.

Thomas Nish – age 38 – Private (33377) 10th Battalion, Royal Scots Fusiliers.
Born 1879 in New Luce. (Source:SNWM and GRoS – Birth Register)
Son of James and Mary (Fenion) Nish of New Luce. (Source: family grave in New Luce Parish Churchyard)
Died on Active Service – 26 January 1917 of pneumonia in Dumfries Infirmary.
(Source:GRoS – Death Register)
Commonwealth War Grave – New Luce Parish Churchyard.
The 10th (Works) Battalion of the RSF was formed in Ayr in June 1916 and moved to Dumbarton. It remained in the UK throughout the war being renamed in April 1917 as the 4th Battalion of the Labour Corps.

© Kenneth Morrison July 2013

Category(s): Village Scenes